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Jewels of India and Indian Culture

Posted by Hemant Khatri on

The richness and vibrancy of Indian culture Is reflected in its one of a kind jewelry. Earlier the domain of just royalty, the tradition of jewelry has now seeped down to the masses but still retains its royal sheen.

The intricacy and delicate work of Indian jewelry is what sets it apart from any other and has led it to becoming an essential part of any brides’ trousseau. Here are the some of the most enchanting types of jewelry indigenous to India.

JADAU:

JADAU

Jadau Jewelry forms one of the major examples of high skilled craftsmanship that was brought into India by Mughals. Uncut diamonds called polki or vilandi are used as the central stone. Meenakari or art work done at the back of the jewel is purely for beautifying purposes. Highest care and attention is given towards the detail on every piece that the master craftsman creates. The stone setters first set the stone in silver foil, then fuse with a finishing of pure gold.

TEMPLE:

TEMPLE

Temple jewelry of India initially used to be described as the jewelry used to adorn the idols of Gods and Goddesses. The statues In India were ornamented with chunky necklaces that were either strung with beads or crafted with intricate filigree. Amongst the other ornaments that adorned statues of deities were large chunky bangles, usually studded with gems. In addition, earrings, nose rings and anklets were also used.

FILIGREE:

FILIGREE

Filigree work is done on silver and involves lots of precision and technicality, added with great amount of patience and an eye for minute details. Historically, filigree work was quite popular in countries like Egypt, Italy, and Spain. India’s history of filigree work goes back to early centuries. Indian filigree work is unique in its genre and aesthetics. It is immensely inspired by Greek filigree work, the same style and old charm has been kept intact till now, by Indian artisans. Filigree jewelry is mainly popular in Orissa and Andhra Pradesh.

MEENAKARI:

MEENAKARI

In Meenakari jewelry, precious stones are set and then enameled with gold. Historically speaking, the art was introduced to Rajasthan artisans by Raja Mansingh Amar. Meenakari is also a team work, where specialization of skill is of paramount importance. As it is generally done on the reverse side of kundan jewellery, meenakari has to work with goldsmith, engraver or ghaaria, designer or chitteria as well as jadiya.

KUNDAN:

KUNDAN

Kundankari is known the world over, with Rajasthan serving as its epicenter. Kundankari is basically done on gold and silver jewelry. The beauty of kundan work lies in the precise setting of stones into kundan and the overall look of the ornament. Traditional kundan jewellery has stones encrusted on one side and colorful and intricate meenakari on the reverse.